Quiet on the mushroom front

Not many posts lately, so I wonder how the season is progressing.

We went out on a mushroom class field trip to the bogs and lakeside last Saturday. Everyone went home with something to eat, mainly little chanterelles, but a few king boletes, and a small Hericium too. Most of the kings were too wormy to take home, sad to say. One fungi fan had an eagle eye for Matsutakes, finding at least 5 and we debated about taking the chance of getting fined for having them in her basket, as per USFS mushroom permit. I mentioned cutting them in half to keep the commercial value at zero, but I left it up to her to keep them or not. It seems like such an unreasonable rule.

I also noticed how high the mushroom-hunting activity has been in the areas where we go with the class. Discarded specimens were everywhere when we arrived. Even at that, our picnic table was full of a wide variety of mushrooms, even nice buttons, so I guess they can’t get them all. The wet swampy areas seem to be our only salvation during this drought, so I am very grateful for bogs right now. Please think RAIN.

2 Responses to “Quiet on the mushroom front”

  1. Sent by DW, a mushrooming friend:

    I went down to crescent lake and found 8 matsutskes. Generally I found them by observing soil being up lifted and then digging them out. Also found about 10 lbs of white chanterelles. Most of the chanterelles were still covered by soil too.

  2. My Wednesday foray resulted in 1 Flett’s polypore, 1 slippery jac, 2 different Russulas(about 9 total), and 2 matsutakes. Of course, I left the matsis in the woods(LOL), and the others stayed in place. Brutally dry.

    I would pay for the noncommercial permit for matsutakes, but I usually have zero idea on when I am going to make a quick trip to the woods. The date specification aspect is the killer. I know that there are too many ways to cheat without the date specification, but it sure does hurt the average Joe Public.

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