Month: October 2017

1st Central Oregon Mushroom Club Fungi Fest

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Thanks to all of you who contributed mushrooms and time to make this Fungi Fest fun and festive! 120 people attended the event despite the snowy/rainy day and a drive to Sunriver.  A big shout out to Sunriver Nature Center, especially Amanda Accamondo,  for all the support throughout the planning and the event itself.  What a terrific organization.

The mushroom season has been poor this fall and gatherers came from all over, even as far away as the coast,  to make sure we had specimens. Most of the mushrooms (90%), however, came from within an hour and a bit of Bend. Another thank your to the Cascade Mycological Society for sharing their mushroom labels.  This made naming specimens much easier, but still very challenging without a REAL mycologist on hand.  Here are a few photos of our small, but lovely show.

More photos to come.

Plenty of woody polypores and other interesting non-gilled mushrooms

Plenty of woody polypores and other interesting non-gilled mushrooms

morenont-gilledwithBuddy&Julie's

Touch Here Table

Touch Here Table

Setup crew on a snowy morning

Setup crew on a snowy morning

Chip sold all the oyster mushrooms he brought. Lovely pinks!

Chip sold all the oyster mushrooms he brought. Lovely pinks!

Intensely creative Susanne found a way to show how morels fruit in a burn by rehydrating last spring's flush and mounting them in a burn habitat. Genius!

Intensely creative Susanne found a way to show how morels fruit in a burn by rehydrating last spring’s flush and mounting them in a burn habitat. Genius!

Not all specimens got identified, but common genus types were represented.

Not all specimens got identified, but common genus types were represented.

With only two large tables, we were able to get most of the mushrooms displayed.

With only two large tables, we were able to get most of the mushrooms displayed.

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FUNGI FEST this Saturday!

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image1We are excited about our first mushroom show and have been working hard to make it successful.  This mushroom season, however, has been a challenge. Though we have found plenty of white Chanterelles, we want to have a full range of fungi for the show. You can help if you are willing to carefully gather a variety of specimens  and bring them to me by Friday.  Contact Linda at linronad@bendbroadband.com.

Categories: Information

Recent discussion continues about eating mushrooms from red fire foam areas

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Red fire foam coating the forest - is it okay to eat the mushrooms?

Red fire foam coating the forest – is it okay to eat the mushrooms?

Several people have been talking about the safety of mushrooms growing in woods that have been recently sprayed with retardant. If any of you readers have comments or information about this, please post a comment or link.

A mushroom student and chemistry teacher here at the local college sent me this email reply to my question:

 

From Carol H.

“Wikipedia has a nice descriptive page on the foams that are used in firefighting, both for structural fires and for wildland fires:      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Firefighting_foam

I probably was overstating concern about the chemicals used in them when we chatted about this last night.  I remember having a conversation with some fire science students a few years ago where they mentioned AFFF, which contains fluorinated organic chemicals (fluorine on a carbon backbone).  That stuff is mentioned in the Wikipedia article and is a halogenated organic:  a member of a family of compounds that raise a little environmental concern in me.  There are some bad actors in that group.

BUT I was not correct in making them sound as bad as polychlorinated or polybrominated biphenyls. Those are the bad actors in that family, and are the compounds that are used in flame-retardants used in furniture.

The firefighting foams are mostly water and surfactants (detergents, soaps).  The foam helps hold the water to the things that could burn, which makes them better than water alone. It looks like the red color may be from iron in the formula, added to aid visibility.

As far as foraging from places that have recently been foamed, I still probably wouldn’t do it.

Thanks for giving me a reason to look this up!”

 

 

 

 

Categories: Information

Sunday’s COMC field trip ends with many smiles and Chanterelles for all!

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A little Sparrasis, some white Chanterelles and some smiles!

A little Sparrasis, some white Chanterelles and some smiles!

Field trip over Santiam Pass where everyone went home with some Chanterelles.

Field trip over Santiam Pass where everyone went home with some Chanterelles.

a.k.a. Paxillus atrotomentosus, or just Velvet Foot.

a.k.a. Paxillus atrotomentosus, or just Velvet Foot. This mushroom has been found every frequently lately. Note the fuzzy stem just where it meets the large gills, hence the name.

Thank you, Buddy Mays  for the great photos!

 

 

Categories: Information