Month: September 2017

COMC Field Trip to Big Meadows 9/24/17

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Here are fine photos taken by Buddy Mays.   Most all participants found Chanterelles, but very little else was fruiting out there except this lovely Laetiporus sulphureus  – Chicken of the Woods.Julie cleaning ChanterellesLinda Talking mushrooms

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A beautiful day to be in the woods and a little too early for many mushrooms. Missing three of our hunters for the photo. They were busy picking mushrooms.

Field trip Friends 9/24/117

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Recipe for Julie’s pickled Chanterelles

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Julies's pickled chanterells

From Julie
“I think you could use it with other kinds of mushrooms.   I’m thinking pickled matsatake in rice vinegar with a few chilis. Hmmm.”
Pickled Chanterelle Mushrooms
Prep Time        20 mins
Cook Time       20 mins
Total Time       40 mins

The key to these pickles is to dry saute your chanterelles first. You clean your ‘shrooms, cut them into large pieces (leave small mushrooms whole) and put them into a hot frying pan dry. Shake them around as they heat and soon the mushrooms will give up their water. Doing that helps both the flavor of the mushroom and their ability to absorb the vinegar. If you don’t want to can these mushrooms, they will be perfectly fine in the fridge for up to 6 months.

Serves: 2 pints
AuthorHank Shaw
Ingredients
  • 1 to 1 1/2 pounds chanterelles or other mushrooms
  • 2 cups white wine vinegar (I used apple cider vinegar)
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 2 tablespoons kosher salt
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 2 teaspoons dried thyme
  • 1 teaspoon black peppercorns
Instructions
  1. Get your canning gear ready and a large pot of water hot. Clean your mushrooms of any dirt, mold or wet spots. Cut large ones in half and keep small chanterelles whole.
  2. Dry saute the mushrooms in a large frying pan. When they give up their water, sprinkle 1 tablespoon of salt on them, along with the thyme. Once the chanterelles have given up most of their water, pour over the rest of the ingredients and bring to a boil. Turn the temperature down to a simmer and cook for 5 minutes. Turn off the heat.
  3. Fish out the mushrooms and pack firmly into jars, leaving at least 1/2 inch headspace. Make sure each jar gets a bay leaf and some peppercorns.
  4. Ladle in the cooking liquid. Make sure it covers the mushrooms. Add more white wine vinegar or distilled vinegar to top off if necessary. Wipe the rims of the jars and seal. Process in a boiling water bath for 15 minutes.
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Pholitoa aurivella – scalycap

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This is Pholiota aurivella, sometimes called Pholiota limonella, which looks just like this only the spore sizes are different.  They grow on conifers around here in the fall and their shiny golden caps can be see from far away as they climb up the tree snags.  Pholiotas have brown spores, less rusty colored than Cortinarius species and grow directly out of wood, but can easily confused with Corts due to the disappearing cobwebby veil.  This is not edible, just beautiful!

Pholiota aurivella

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Mushroom season is here!

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Susanne’s beautiful basket and her first Chanterelles of 2917!  She hunted near the Cultus Lake in the High Lakes area!  Great to have the Suzanne and chanterelles 2017forest fires finally dowsed by rain!!

 

 

 

 

 

Nest is a shot of Julie’s pickled Chanterelles.  One way to prep when you have just to many!

Julies's pickled chanterells

 

 

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September Meeting for COMC on Weds. Sept 13.

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Rachel ZollerOur next mushroom club meeting will be Weds., Sept. 13 from 6-8 PM at the Environmental Center in Bend.  This month’s presenter is Rachel Zoller, speaking on Mushroom Foraging – what to do and what not to do when hunting for mushrooms.  She will talk about basic id. practices and share her struggles as she searched for answers to identify these puzzling fungi. She has many tips to make this process easier and will soon finish her book for beginners to be published by Roost Books. Rachel is an active member of Portland’s Oregon Mycological Society and leads lectures and mushroom field trips throughout the PNW.  Her workshops often sell out and her popular blogsite is full of videos, photos and info from her mushroom adventures. http://www.yellowelanor.com/
Please join us!  If you are lucky enough to find mushrooms, bring them for all of us to see! The first half hour will be social/mushroom identification time.
Save the date!! In October, our club is hosting the first mushroom show in Central Oregon in collaboration with Sunriver Nature Center.  The dates are Oct. 20-21.  If you can help with this exciting event, please let me know.  We will need mushroom gathers and helpers during and after the show.
Meanwhile, do your best rain dance (without the thunder part!)
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