Category: Information

Recipe for Julie’s pickled Chanterelles

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Julies's pickled chanterells

From Julie
“I think you could use it with other kinds of mushrooms.   I’m thinking pickled matsatake in rice vinegar with a few chilis. Hmmm.”
Pickled Chanterelle Mushrooms
Prep Time        20 mins
Cook Time       20 mins
Total Time       40 mins

The key to these pickles is to dry saute your chanterelles first. You clean your ‘shrooms, cut them into large pieces (leave small mushrooms whole) and put them into a hot frying pan dry. Shake them around as they heat and soon the mushrooms will give up their water. Doing that helps both the flavor of the mushroom and their ability to absorb the vinegar. If you don’t want to can these mushrooms, they will be perfectly fine in the fridge for up to 6 months.

Serves: 2 pints
AuthorHank Shaw
Ingredients
  • 1 to 1 1/2 pounds chanterelles or other mushrooms
  • 2 cups white wine vinegar (I used apple cider vinegar)
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 2 tablespoons kosher salt
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 2 teaspoons dried thyme
  • 1 teaspoon black peppercorns
Instructions
  1. Get your canning gear ready and a large pot of water hot. Clean your mushrooms of any dirt, mold or wet spots. Cut large ones in half and keep small chanterelles whole.
  2. Dry saute the mushrooms in a large frying pan. When they give up their water, sprinkle 1 tablespoon of salt on them, along with the thyme. Once the chanterelles have given up most of their water, pour over the rest of the ingredients and bring to a boil. Turn the temperature down to a simmer and cook for 5 minutes. Turn off the heat.
  3. Fish out the mushrooms and pack firmly into jars, leaving at least 1/2 inch headspace. Make sure each jar gets a bay leaf and some peppercorns.
  4. Ladle in the cooking liquid. Make sure it covers the mushrooms. Add more white wine vinegar or distilled vinegar to top off if necessary. Wipe the rims of the jars and seal. Process in a boiling water bath for 15 minutes.
Categories: Information

Pholitoa aurivella – scalycap

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This is Pholiota aurivella, sometimes called Pholiota limonella, which looks just like this only the spore sizes are different.  They grow on conifers around here in the fall and their shiny golden caps can be see from far away as they climb up the tree snags.  Pholiotas have brown spores, less rusty colored than Cortinarius species and grow directly out of wood, but can easily confused with Corts due to the disappearing cobwebby veil.  This is not edible, just beautiful!

Pholiota aurivella

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Mushroom season is here!

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Susanne’s beautiful basket and her first Chanterelles of 2917!  She hunted near the Cultus Lake in the High Lakes area!  Great to have the Suzanne and chanterelles 2017forest fires finally dowsed by rain!!

 

 

 

 

 

Nest is a shot of Julie’s pickled Chanterelles.  One way to prep when you have just to many!

Julies's pickled chanterells

 

 

Categories: Information

September Meeting for COMC on Weds. Sept 13.

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Rachel ZollerOur next mushroom club meeting will be Weds., Sept. 13 from 6-8 PM at the Environmental Center in Bend.  This month’s presenter is Rachel Zoller, speaking on Mushroom Foraging – what to do and what not to do when hunting for mushrooms.  She will talk about basic id. practices and share her struggles as she searched for answers to identify these puzzling fungi. She has many tips to make this process easier and will soon finish her book for beginners to be published by Roost Books. Rachel is an active member of Portland’s Oregon Mycological Society and leads lectures and mushroom field trips throughout the PNW.  Her workshops often sell out and her popular blogsite is full of videos, photos and info from her mushroom adventures. http://www.yellowelanor.com/
Please join us!  If you are lucky enough to find mushrooms, bring them for all of us to see! The first half hour will be social/mushroom identification time.
Save the date!! In October, our club is hosting the first mushroom show in Central Oregon in collaboration with Sunriver Nature Center.  The dates are Oct. 20-21.  If you can help with this exciting event, please let me know.  We will need mushroom gathers and helpers during and after the show.
Meanwhile, do your best rain dance (without the thunder part!)
Categories: Information

Mushrooms as Art

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My apologies to whoever did this lovely collage of mushrooms.  My friend cut this out of a magazine and gave it to me, then forgot which magazine it was.  I can’t give credit, but I wanted to share this anyway.  If you know the artist or magazine, please let me know so I can acknowledge their work. – Update:  This  beautiful work is done by Jill Bliss!

The beauty of fungi

The beauty of fungi

Mushrooms as art #1

Categories: Information

Neolentinus ponderosus – frequent local fruitings this spring

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I have received several emails about this mushroom and we found several yesterday on a field trip.  Because it’s favorite host is pine, we find it in Central Oregon each mushroom season and the mushroom lasts a long time.  It can grow to be over a foot in diameter! Sometimes called the Giant Sawgill, though I have never heard this.  I learned it as Lentinus ponderosus, but they changed it to Neolentinus because the brown rot it causes in pines is not white like Lentinus species.  With that in mind, it isn’t a good candidate for your compost pile.  As an edible, it is tough and just okay, in my opinion, though some sites online say the young specimens are quite good.  I do know that you need to slice it very very thin. Maybe my mushroom was too old.

Tough, long-lasting mushroom growing on wood.

Tough, long-lasting mushroom growing on wood.

serrated gill edge

Note the jagged and torn look to the gill edge of older specimens. This and the tough stature and growth on wood make Neolentinus a distinctive species.

Categories: Information

PLEASE READ THIS IF YOU HAVE DOGS OR YOUNG CHILDREN AT HOME!

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Julie Hamilton worked many hours on this tri-fold brochure for dog owners to have at home.  Check you yard and property for these mushrooms that come up most commonly in the spring in Central Oregon.  They grow in my yard in SE Bend every year so I know that there are others.  The folks in LaPine have large fruitings of Amanita aprica most springs, so do diligence and frequently check, then dispose of the mushrooms in the trash, NOT the compost!

If we can save one dog’s life or a trip to the vet, then it is all worth the effort.  Every year we get calls to identify mushrooms that are poisoning animals.

dog flyer

Categories: Information

Stinkhorn that’s not so stinky – Phallus hadriani

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Marianne's email photo

Marianne’s email photo

No, this is not a morel.

These mushrooms come up in people’s gardens in the spring. They emerge from a purple fuzzy egg into a phallic form that has a sticky green spore mass oozing at the top. Most stinkhorns are putrid, but this one just smells strange.  I have never seen them washed, but Marianne thought they might be morels and I can see the resemblance, but NO!  I have read that they purple eggs are edible, but you go feat them first and post how they taste! Fascinating mushroom!

 

 

 

..and they are still not morels, even washed!

..and they are still not morels, even washed!

Note structure inside the egg. I transplanted them to my yard but never got a fruiting.

Note structure inside the egg. I transplanted them to my yard but never got a fruiting. My photo from 2012.

Categories: Information

Clair’s annual bolete photo on June 12

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From Clair K. ‘s email
Weighed in at 15 lb. Even the big ones are in decent shape, and will go in the drier. The buttons will go on the grill tonight.
I had to quit early, ‘cause I didn’t feel like processing more than that!
Seems like the best ones are at 5500 ft. or higher now. The warming temperatures through the week will probably blow them out fast
Only saw one morel today, an old one.
Clair

Clair's boletes 6:12:17

Categories: Information