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Interview with Paul Stamets

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This link will lead you to a current 2-hour interview with Paul Stamets.  You may prefer to watch it in 2 or 3 settings so you can think about what he says, but he is so fascinating to me that I sat through the whole thing.  I have heard some of these stories in his other talks, but he always adds a little extra.  Well worth you time.  I am so thankful that I have this great hobby! We are living at the perfect time for mushroom exploration and discovery. The sky (the universe?) is the limit!

Interview with Paul Stamets

Paul Stamets with his hat made in Transylvania from mushrooms.

Paul Stamets with his hat made in Transylvania from mushrooms.

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Shaggy Parasols fruiting in November!

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Growing in grass clipping pile in sagebrush acreage

Growing in grass clipping pile in sagebrush acreage

Uncovered grass to find huge clusters of mushrooms!

Uncovered grass to find huge clusters of mushrooms!

Close look at cluster.

Close look at cluster.

 

Underside of button. Note the orange staining when cut or broken.

Underside of button. Note the orange staining when cut or broken.

Bulbous stem is very distinctive and typical of C. brunneum

Bulbous stem is very distinctive and typical of C. brunneum

 

The local extension service gave Jackie my number and she sent me these photos of a cluster of Chlorophyllum brunneum growing in her ancient pile of grass clippings.  With Buddy’s help, I cooked some for her and went out to get more to eat and share. Because it has been so very cold (in the low 20s at night) and we have had snow and sleet, I expected they would all be gone.  Fortunately the grass clippings kept them somewhat protected and we harvested many more to eat and marvel.

Check out your pastures and gardens for unseasonable surprises!

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Buddy Mays’s photo of Shaggy Parasol

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The buttons are all clustered from one central mass of mycelium.

The buttons are all clustered from one central mass of mycelium.

Buddy took the time to harvest these Chlorophyllum brunneum buttons as they emerged from one central clump and pose them for this great photo.  They are excellent eating, reminding me of Portobellos and beautiful to find , especially in cold November!

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Last meeting for 2017 a delightful evening.

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Our club met for one last time before spring on  a wintery evening, Weds. Nov. 8, but this time we used our own resources instead of hiring from outside.  Many thanks to Julie H. who brought so many good mushrooms to share from her coast trip a few days ago.  The heavy freeze and snow really closed down our hunting areas this side of the mountains unless things drastically warm up.  Julie offered an intro into how to find and begin to ID mushrooms. Linda shared the specimens from the table using our newly laminated ID cards.  Laurence showed a short part of Taylor Lockwood’s DVD and we ended with a panel discussion and story sharing from attendees.  Such a fun evening. Here is photo of our little panel and some of the mushrooms Julie shared with us.

Happy Camper & King collector!

Happy Camper & King collector!

 

 

Panel discusson at our last meeting with Linda, Julie and Laurence answering questions and swapping tales.

Panel discusson at our last meeting with Linda, Julie and Laurence answering questions and swapping tales.

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Amanitaville on the coast

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We found no less than 5 different species of Amanitas in the Central Oregon coast range near the Umqua river on Halloween day. Amazing specimens.  I am sorry that I was too excited to take many photos, but I have one and the rest from when I got home. The main cluster, and most exciting was underneath a big leaf maple, though Doug firs were nearby.  4 GIANtT mushrooms,  one with a stem of 12″ and cap of 8″,  were pushing through the moss and maple leaves on a glorious  fall day. I picked them all hoping they were A. calyptroderma, a species we had sampled at the Eugene club’s mushroom show.  I am not experienced in identifying the edible Amanitas and have been taught to avoid all of them.  As I learn, I have become more comfortable with the concept of trying Amanitas, but not finding and eating them myself.

I CAREFULLY dug up  each one getting all of the volva from the base which was mostly buried in the ground and wrapped them gently in wax paper.  As soon as I got home, I started to work on them with all the info and every book I could find.  I emailed my trusted identifiers with photos and descriptions and posted on PNW mushroom identification’s FB page.  From everything I learned, these are Amanita calyptroderma, though a darker brown version than usual.  No one would give me the green light on eating  them unless I drove to the valley for a hands-on ID.  I totally get that. Then they froze outside and their features have changed. If only I could find these often enough to get completely familiar and comfortable.  They are just too close to the deadly A. phalloides to make it worth the experiment.  Maybe next time.  More Amanitas later.

So  fresh  and perfect and I want it to be A. calyptroderma!

So fresh and perfect and I want it to be A. calyptroderma!

Long stem!

Long stem!

the many deep grooves along the cap (sulcate)  and thick volva at the base  and top are distinct features  of A. calyptroderma.

The many deep grooves along the cap edge (sulcate) and thick volva at the base and patched top are distinct features of A. calyptroderma. Unfortunately, the ring around the stem, partial veil, should be much sturdier, not disappearlng like these.

Stem is 12" long!

Stem is 12″ long!. Not white patches of volva stuck in the center of the cap. Large white patches in the middle of the cap are characteristics of several edible Amanitas

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More Fungi Fest photos – field trip shots and show moments

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Categories: Information

Last mushroom club meeting for 2017 on Weds., Nov. , 6-8 PM

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Our next club meeting will be this Weds. evening, Nov. 8,  from 6 to 8 PM at the Environmental Center, 16 NW Kansas, in downtown Bend. For the month of Nov. the steering committee decided not to invite a guest speaker but to use our local resources, instead. The first half hour will be geared toward beginning mushroom identification and then show and tell from things brought in for the table (we hope you will bring mushrooms.) At 7 PM we will have a panel discussion led by several club leaders, moderated by Michelle. We want to hear your questions and stories about mushrooms, too, so come with questions and your experiences to share with others.
Our next time together will be the “Survivor’s Banquet,” a potluck event and mushroom photo contest.  You can bring your 8 x 10 print to Laurence at this meeting if you are ready.  Please put your name, phone and email on the back.  He must receive them all before the Feb. 3 potluck.  All folks at the event will vote on the displayed photos, choosing their favorites. Prizes will be given to the winners in attendance.  It’s lots of fun and the food is amazing, so put it on your calendar!
Remember that several of us are willing to help you figure out what you have picked. You need to harvest carefully, take photos of the underside and top in its habitat and have a book you use for identification. Start with one or two mushrooms that seem unique to you. Yes, the mushroom season around here is coming to a close with deep freezes expected this week. However, if you travel to the coast or even to the valley, mushrooms are still fruiting in big numbers.  Get out and give it a try.
By the way, the Brookings club is having their first mushroom show this Saturday, Nov. 4, 10-4 PM, Wild Rivers Mushroom Festival. Check them out on Facebook.
Enjoy this beautiful autumn while it lasts!
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Mushroom Shows in Eugene and Portland this weekend!

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If you are at all interested in mushrooms, these two events are happening the same day – Sunday, Oct. 29.  They are both delightful fun and full of labeled mushrooms and activities to make your day fungally fun!  We will be going to the Eugene show and will be manning the Edible/Poisonous/Look-alike table from 11-1 PM.  If you are around, please come say hello.

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2017 Mount Pisgah Arboretum Mushroom Festival

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